FR / EN 

2018 Edition
Jury

Fabrice Du WelzFabrice Du Welz
Jury Chair

Fabrice Du Welz is the most fantastic Belgian film director these days! After having studied at the Liège Conservatory for Dramatic Arts and the Brussels School for the Performing Arts, Fabrice Du Welz collaborated on the writing of certain humorous sequences in Canal+’s flagship series, “Nulle Part Ailleurs”. His first short film, “Wonderful Love”, received the Grand Prix at the Gérardmer International Fantasy Film Festival (formerly Fantastic’Arts). He shook up audiences in Cannes with “Calvaire” (“The Ordeal”) and in Venice with “Vinyan”. Following a period of cinematographic upheaval involving budgetary constraints on a film he directed, “Colt 45”, he got back to what he loved doing most at the start of his career with “Alleluia”, making waves, yet again, in Cannes. He then went on to direct a film States-side entitled “Message from the King”, starring Chadwick Boseman, Luke Evans, Teresa Palmer and Alfred Molina. Once back home in Belgium, he wasted no time, and started directing another film this past summer to wrap up the Ardennes mad love trilogy. After “The Ordeal” and “Alleluia”, coming soon to a theater near you is “Adoration”.

 

Charlotte DewulfCharlotte Dewulf

“I believe it’s important to invest in meaningful and original content for youngsters. An audience that is so eager to learn deserves challenging and useful experiences with which to identify. As a writer-director, you can open a door to a fantasy world in which both kids and adults can escape their daily routines and maybe, just maybe, inspire the littlest among us to follow their dreams. In the past, I’ve made two Fantasy short films for children entitled “Eefje Dark Blue” and “Ampersand”. I’m currently developing my first feature film with the support of the Flanders Audiovisual Fund.”

 

Fabio FrizziFabio Frizzi

Arranger, orchestra director, composer of over 100 film and television scores and multiple award-winner, Fabio Frizzi has followed in the footsteps of the greats in Italian cinema. His career truly took off following his work in the satirical cult classic, “Fantozzi”. In 2003, Quentin Tarantino paid tribute to him by incorporating the theme from “Sette note in nero” (“The Psychic”) in the soundtrack for his film, “Kill Bill: Vol. 1”. He has paired up with famous Italian directors such as Luciano Salce, Steno, Vittorio Sindoni, Tonino Valerii, Gabriele Lavia, Bruno Corbucci, and Carlo and Enrico Vanzina. His long-standing work with director Lucio Fulci (from 1975 to 1990) would remain the most well-known, hoisting him to international visibility and making his horror scores a household name in works such as “…E tu vivrai nel terrore! L’aldilà” (“The Beyond” or “7 Doors of Death”), “Paura nella città dei morti viventi” (“City of the Living Dead”), “I quattro dell'apocalisse” (“Four of the Apocalypse”), “Sette note in nero” (“The Psychic”), “Sella d’argento” (“Silver Saddle”, “The Man in the Silver Saddle” or “They Died with Their Boots On”), “Zombi 2”, “Manhattan Baby” and “Nightmare Concert”.

 

Christophe TaudièreChristophe Taudière

Christophe Taudière has been heading up the Short Film Division at France Télévisions since April 2011. After completing studies in Humanities and Modern Literature and earning a Master’s degree in Media Techniques and Languages (Paris IV Sorbonne), he went on to work as literary contributor in 1999 for France 2’s Short Film television program, Histoires courtes, alongside Alain Gauvreau. In 2003, he became its Programming Coordinator and Editor-in-Chief.
 

 

Sylvie LainéSylvie Lainé

Sylvie Lainé is Professor of Information and Communication Science at the University of Lyon. Her Science Fiction short stories and novellas have earned her critical acclaim. Recipient of the Prix Rosny-Aîné four times and the Grand Prix de l’Imaginaire for speculative fiction twice (for Les yeux d’Elsa in 2007 and Opéra de Shaya in 2015), she has also received numerous awards in France and Quebec. Her short stories appear in five collections published by Éditions ActuSF. When she isn’t masterminding Sci-Fi plots, she is busy with other more preternatural writing endeavors (graphic novels, essays, etc.). The majority of her Sci-Fi short stories published by Éditions ActuSF in 2016 may be found in a prestige format entitled Fidèle à ton pas balancé. She was a Member of the Jury in 2012 at the “À nous de voir” Scientific Film Festival in Oullins.

 

Catriona MacollCatriona Macoll

In 1979, Catriona MacColl received her first leading role in “Lady Oscar” directed by Jacques Demy. She is best known for her myriad roles in the Italian horror films by none other than Lucio Fulci. The Avoriaz Film Festival in 1980 was the occasion wherein horror fans first became acquainted with her in “City of the Living Dead” (“Paura nella città dei morti viventi”). The film was an instant hit, and took home the Grand Prix du Public. With tremendous esteem for the actress’s unbridled talent, Lucio Fulci seized the opportunity to offer her the leading role in his violence incarnate work, “L’Aldilà” (“The Beyond” or “7 Doors of Death”). Yet again, the film was a triumph for director and actress alike. Catriona agreed to take on her third consecutive film for him, “Quella villa accanto al cimitero” (“The House by the Cemetery”), considered, at the time, the nec plus ultra of his cinematographic career. Although proud of the success following the “Gates of Hell” trilogy, the actress craved other horizons beyond the Fantastic realm. She appeared in “Les Diplômés du dernier rang”, a comedy directed by Christian Gion (1982), and met up again with Jacques Demy in the pseudo-documentary retracing the life of Yves Montand, “Trois places pour le 26”. In 1998, she played Mrs. Smith in “La fille d’un soldat ne pleure jamais”. Her sanguinary cinematic past made her long for the early days of her career, taking on a role in Pascal Laugier’s “Saint Ange” (“House of Voices”) in 2004. She also appeared as a witch alongside Udo Kier and Debbie Rochon in a segment of the anthology film, “The Theatre Bizarre”, in 2011.